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Riz Khan
9/11's first responders
Is the US government doing enough to look after Ground Zero rescue and clean-up workers?
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2010 09:24 GMT

To what extent did toxic dust and debris from the September 11, 2001 attacks at the World Trade Center contribute to health problems of firefighters and other first responders who risked their lives to help victims at Ground Zero?

Nearly nine years later, the after-effects of the attack continue to claim lives. Thousands of rescue and clean-up workers say they face chronic respiratory illnesses, cancer and other medical conditions. Some have died waiting for help and attention from the government.

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A proposed US law that would provide healthcare and compensation for those responders failed to pass in Congress this summer, causing anger amongst advocates who say the heroes of September 11 are being left behind.

On Thursday's Riz Khan we ask: What more should be done to help first responders of the 9/11 attacks?

Joining the programme are Richard Skinner of the FealGood Foundation, an advocacy group for 9/11 first responders, and Terry Miles, the executive director of the World Trade Center Environmental Health Center in New York.

This episode of Riz Khan aired from Thursday, September 9, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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