[QODLink]
Riz Khan
9/11's first responders
Is the US government doing enough to look after Ground Zero rescue and clean-up workers?
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2010 09:24 GMT

To what extent did toxic dust and debris from the September 11, 2001 attacks at the World Trade Center contribute to health problems of firefighters and other first responders who risked their lives to help victims at Ground Zero?

Nearly nine years later, the after-effects of the attack continue to claim lives. Thousands of rescue and clean-up workers say they face chronic respiratory illnesses, cancer and other medical conditions. Some have died waiting for help and attention from the government.

JOIN THE DEBATE


Send us your views and get your voice on the air

A proposed US law that would provide healthcare and compensation for those responders failed to pass in Congress this summer, causing anger amongst advocates who say the heroes of September 11 are being left behind.

On Thursday's Riz Khan we ask: What more should be done to help first responders of the 9/11 attacks?

Joining the programme are Richard Skinner of the FealGood Foundation, an advocacy group for 9/11 first responders, and Terry Miles, the executive director of the World Trade Center Environmental Health Center in New York.

This episode of Riz Khan aired from Thursday, September 9, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Polio remains endemic in Pakistan as health workers battle anti-vaccine prejudice and threat to life by armed groups.
Despite 14-year struggle for a new mosque in the second-largest city, new roadblocks are erected at every turn.
Authorities and demonstrators have shown no inclination to yield despite growing economic damage and protest pressure.
Lebanese-born Rula Ghani may take cues from the modernising Queen Soraya, but she'll have to proceed with caution.
One of the world's last hunter-gatherer tribes has been forced from the forest it called home by a major dam project.