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RIZ KHAN
Women's rights in Afghanistan
Has the plight of Afghan women improved and what will happen when the US leaves?
Last Modified: 29 Aug 2010 13:46 GMT



Women in Afghanistan have more rights since the Taliban was driven from power nine years ago.

More than 25 per cent percent of seats in the Afghan parliament are now reserved for women and they have a voice in the decision-making process.

But an overwhelming majority is still treated very badly and many say US forces should stay on beyond July 2011 to protect and promote women's rights.

Others argue the condition of Afghan women can improve only by ending poverty and conflict - not by extending foreign occupation.

JOIN THE DEBATE


Send us your views and get your voice on the air

On Wednesday's Riz Khan we ask: What can be done to make Afghanistan a better place for women?

We will be joined by Afghan activist Wazhma Frogh, who received the US state department's 2009 International Woman of Courage Award for her work on human rights in Afghanistan.

We will also have American author Gayle Lemmon who has written a book on Afghanistan titled: The Dressmaker of Khair Khana. It tells the story of an Afghan girl whose business created jobs for more than 100 women in Kabul during the Taliban years.

You can join the conversation. Call in with your questions and comments on Wednesday, August 18, at our live time of 1630GMT. Repeats air at 2130GMT, and the next day at 0230GMT and 1130GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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