[QODLink]
RIZ KHAN
The other oil spill
As the world focuses on the Gulf of Mexico, Nigeria faces its own environmental disaster.
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2010 09:10 GMT

The BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico is now the biggest oil disaster in US history.

But beyond the media spotlight in Nigeria, environmentalists say as much as 550 million gallons of oil have poured into the Niger Delta River in the past 50 years and people who live there blame Shell for ruining their land and livelihoods.

The government has promised to tackle the problem but with 80 per cent of Nigeria's revenue's coming from oil and gas, will they be able to take a tough stance on big oil companies?

On Tuesday's show we are joined by: Oronto Douglas, currently an aide to Goodluck Jonathan, the Nigerian president, and a former lawyer on the defence team for the activist Ken Saro Wiwa, who was executed by Nigeria's military rulers in 1995; from Alaska Rick Steiner, a marine biologist; and from Strasbourg Geert Risema, a lawyer with Friends of the Earth International.

We will be discussing the environmental and human rights challenges facing the Niger Delta.

This episode of the Riz Khan show aired from Tuesday, July 6, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.