[QODLink]
RIZ KHAN
Is Afghanistan a failing state?
We ask whether the approach to corruption, chaos and violence has been handled wrongly.
Last Modified: 01 Jun 2010 09:03 GMT



How critical is Afghanistan's stability for the rest of the world - and what needs to be done to bolster its political and security institutions?

Afghanistan remains in crisis more than eight years after a US-led military force invaded the country following the attacks of September 11, 2001.

The Taliban was driven from power and the international community promised to stabilise and rebuild the country. But it has not quite turned out that way.

International troops are trying to quell an increasingly resurgent Taliban insurgency, the country now produces 90 per cent of the world's opium, which is used to make heroin, corruption has seeped into every level of Afghan society, and Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president, has come under intense criticism.

On Monday's Riz Khan we ask: Why is it so hard for Western powers to resolve the situation in Afghanistan? And has the approach to corruption, chaos, and violence been handled wrongly?

Joining us to discuss those issues will be Dr Abdullah Abdullah, the former Afghan foreign minister and presidential candidate.

This episode aired on Monday, May 31, 2010.

Source:
Al; Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps have been released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.