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Riz Khan
Is carbon trading a scam?
We discuss whether the system is being exploited to the detriment of the environment.
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2010 14:54 GMT

Watch part two

The Kyoto Protocols called upon 38 industrialised countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 2012 to levels that are 5.2 per cent lower than those of 1990.

This led to the rise of carbon trading markets, where carbon is given a value and traded like stocks.

Polluting nations can buy "credits" from nations that do not pollute as much, allowing the richer companies and governments to continue polluting.

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On the other hand, companies and governments in industrial countries have a financial incentive to pollute less.

So is carbon trading a win-win situation, helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and helping poorer countries make money by selling their credits? Or is the system being exploited - to the detriment of the environment?

On Monday we speak with Daphne Wysham, a critic of the trading scheme and founder of the Sustainable Energy and Economy Network in Washington, Joseph Romm, an advocate of the "cap-and-trade" system who runs the influential policy blog, Climate Progress, in Washington, and Patrick Birley, the chief executive of the European Climate Exchange.

You can join the conversation. Call in with your questions and comments on Monday, March 29, 2010 at our new live time at 1630GMT, with repeats at 2130GMT, and the next day at 0230GMT and 1130GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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