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RIZ KHAN
Falluja's birth defects
Are US weapons behind the increasing number of birth defects in the Iraqi city?
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2010 10:17 GMT

Doctors in the Iraqi city of Falluja are handling up to 15 times as many birth defects as they were one year ago.

The chronic deformities include multiple tumours, heart problems, nervous system anomalies and eye deficiencies.

Residents of the city blame the surge in chronic deformities on controversial weapons used by US forces against Sunni fighters in 2004.

White phosphorus and depleted uranium shells were allegedly among the munitions used.

Most doctors are unsure about the reasons for the surge in birth deformities over the past year but say it could be a result of the chemicals left over from the fighting. 

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The US military has dismissed those allegations.

On Wednesday's Riz Khan we ask if US weapons are behind the sharp rise in birth defects in Falluja.

Joining the conversation will be Dr Muhamad Tareq al-Darraji who authored the report Prohibited Weapons Crisis about the impact of the US military assault on the Falluja population, and Dahr Jamail, an American journalist who reported extensively from Iraq on the US invasion and its aftermath.

This episode of the Riz Khan show aired on Wednesday, March 10, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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