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Riz Khan
Fighting climate change
Can Richard Branson marry the roles of industrialist and eco-entrepreneur?
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2009 09:54 GMT



Watch part two

With global leaders gathered in New York City this week for the UN General Assembly, the debate on climate change has taken on a new sense of urgency.

Negotiations over a new global climate change treaty to replace the expiring Kyoto Protocol are underway, but mired in debate.

Rich countries argue that poor countries should be doing more, and vice versa.

But with less than 70 days before the UN climate change summit in Copenhagen, world leaders have agreed that something must be done now.

That is a sentiment that Richard Branson, the founder of the Virgin empire of businesses, would agree with.

In the past few years he has launched for-profit ventures that aim to reduce emissions and find more energy-efficient ways to travel.

He has also announced a $25 million dollar prize - the biggest such reward in history - for anyone who can come up with a system for removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

Continuing his special week of programmes from New York, Riz asks Branson how he can be one of the world's biggest industrialists and eco-entrepreneurs at the same time.

This episode of the Riz Khan show aired from Thursday, September 24.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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