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Riz Khan
Is stability attainable in Iraq?
Former Iraqi prime minister Ayad Allawi discusses the challenges facing his country.
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2009 07:16 GMT

Watch part two

Deadly attacks have increased in some parts of Iraq since national forces took charge of security following the US troop pullback from Iraqi cities in June. 

A massive bombing at Iraqi ministry offices in Baghdad killed 100 people a few weeks ago, shaking the credibility of Nuri al-Maliki, the Iraqi prime minister. 

Some of his main allies in parliament have deserted him, leaving his party vulnerable ahead of elections scheduled for January. Violence also remains very high in Mosul, which remains an urban battleground for Sunni extremist groups.

On Tuesday's show we discuss Iraq's many challenges for the future. Riz is joined by Ayad Allawi, the former Iraqi prime minister who led Iraq for almost a year after the US-led coalition handed over power to the Iraqi interim government in June 2004.

This episode of the Riz Khan show aired from Tuesday, September 15, 2009.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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