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Riz Khan
Myanmar's verdict
In the light of Aung Suu Kyi's verdict we discuss the way forward for the country.
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2009 06:44 GMT

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Aung San Suu Kyi, the long-detained Myanmar opposition leader, has been sentenced to a further 18 months house arrest by a Myanmar court.

The country's military rulers are under considerable international pressure to release the Nobel peace laureate, who won the 1990 national election but has never been allowed to form a government, and has remained in detention for the last 19 years. 

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Western governments have imposed sanctions on Myanmar for their treatment of Aung San Suu Kyi and other human rights abuses, but these measures have had little effect so far. Nor have efforts by the UN and others to engage the military government produced tangible results.

What is the way forward for Myanmar?

Anand Naidoo is hosting for Riz Khan this week. On Tuesday's show, Anand speaks with Jared Genser, a Washington-based human rights lawyer who works on Aung San Suu Kyi's international legal issues, and Anders Ostergaard, the writer/director of the award-winning documentary Burma VJ.

This episode of the Riz Khan show aired from Tuesday, August 11, 2009.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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