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Riz Khan
Honduras: The way forward
A month after being ousted from power the future of president Zelaya is uncertain.
Last Modified: 29 Jul 2009 11:26 GMT

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A month after he was ousted from power, the future of Manuel Zelaya, the Honduran president, remains uncertain.

After weeks of shuttling between Central America and Washington, Zelaya said he would not leave the border region between Nicaragua and Honduras for at least a week.

While he has criticised the US for not doing enough to condemn the government which replaced him, he has also called for "Hondurans to resolve the problems of Honduras."

Zelaya's supporters continue to stake out the Nicaraguan - Honduran border, awaiting his next move.

Hundreds of people began to gather at the border last week as the deposed leader trekked through Nicaragua, threatening to return to his home country to retake power from the interim government of Roberto Micheletti. 

The Congress is set to the debate a mediator's proposal to break the month long political deadlock.

The San Jose accord, proposed by Oscar Arias, the Costa Rican president, calls for the toppled president to be restored to power but with various limits.

Micheletti has welcomed some parts of the plan but rejected the return of Zelaya as president.

On Tuesday's Riz Khan, we look at the way forward for Honduras and what is next for Zelaya.

Joining the programme, Roberto Flores Bermúdez, Honduras' former ambassador to the US who stepped down from his position one month ago.

This episode of the Riz Khan show aired from Tuesday, July 28, 2009.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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