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Riz Khan
The end of Iran's reformers?
Iran's Guardian Council has confirmed the re-election of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2009 08:27 GMT

Watch part two

After weeks of protests, Iran's top legislative body, the Guardian Council, has confirmed the re-election of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president.

The move seems to leave little room for opposition candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi and his supporters who were seeking reform.

If Mousavi does not back down and accept the Guardian Council's declaration, he risks imprisonment for himself and key supporters.

If he begins the process of reconciliation, Mousavi may end up as the much-weakened voice of the opposition. But, is there another possible scenario?

On Tuesday's show, Riz talks to Azar Nafisi, the international bestselling author of Reading Lolita in Tehran.

She protested against the Shah in 1979 but soon found herself disillusioned with the new leadership in Iran and the restrictions it placed on the country's women.

Nafisi's latest book, Things I've Been Silent About, details her coming-of-age against the background of a political revolution.

We ask Nafisi if this is the end for Iran's reformers or the next step in the Iranian revolution.

This episode of the Riz Khan show aired on Tuesday, June 30, 2009.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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