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Riz Khan
US troops pull back in Iraq
How will the move impact security in the country?
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2009 10:00 GMT

Watch part two

Iraq enters a new phase in its history on June 30, when US troops pull out of Iraqi cities as part of last year's US-Iraqi Status of Forces Agreement.

Only a handful of US military advisers will remain behind to provide support to their Iraqi counterparts, while most of the 133,000 US troops move to bases inside the country. 

The Iraqi government has proclaimed a national holiday to celebrate the occasion. 

But many – both inside and outside Iraq - worry that overall security will weaken under Iraqi control.

On Monday's show Riz talks to Ali Allawi, the former Iraqi minister of defence, to examine whether pulling US troops out of Iraqi cities is the right move at the right time - or if greater control over its own security will put Iraq's citizens in more danger?

You can join the conversation. Watch the show live from Monday, June 29, 2009 at the following times GMT: Monday: 2030; Tuesday: 0030, 0530, 1130. 

Source:
Al Jazeera
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