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Riz Khan
The effect of unemployment on crime
Will rising unemployment lead to more crime and racism around the world?
Last Modified: 05 Mar 2009 08:23 GMT

Watch part two

This week more than 100 senior representatives of governments, workers' and employers' organisations, are gathering discuss the impact of the economic crisis on the more than 20 million people employed in the financial sector worldwide.

An International Labor Organisation (ILO) report prepared for the meeting says jobs in financial services around the world have been strongly affected, with announced layoffs exceeding 325,000 between August 2007 and 12 February 2009.

However, aside from the fallout on world markets, other outcomes of the economic crisis have been manifested by riots in Greece, xenophobic union action in the UK and social unrest in China.

Violent crime, xenophobia and other social ills tend to be prominent features of the classical political reaction to unemployment. But has the ILO come up with a coherent strategy or policies, to deal with such prospects?

On Tuesday, Riz speaks to economist Jeffrey Sachs, internationally known for his fight against poverty. Also on the programme, the director-general of the International Labor Organisation, Juan Somavia.

This episode of the Riz Khan show aired on Tuesday, February 24, 2009.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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