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One on One
Spike Lee
Riz Khan talks to the award-winning American filmmaker.
Last Modified: 18 Oct 2008 11:07 GMT

Spike Lee with his siblings in Brooklyn[Courtesy of Lee's family]
He is a filmmaker who draws on his knowledge of life on the streets, to put a gritty reality into his projects.

This week on One on One, meet the outspoken, award-winning filmmaker, Spike Lee.

The southern US city of Atlanta was the birthplace of Shelton Jackson Lee – the son of a teacher and musician. His family moved to Brooklyn, New York, when he was young, placing him in an environment that eventually became the inspiration for a lot of the social commentary in his work.

Spike Lee studied film and started his first movie, She's Gotta Have It on a budget of just $175,000 in 1985. It went on to gross more than $7million when it was released in 1986.

Lee went on to make iconic films such as Malcolm X, on the life of the legendary black leader, and Inside Man, a quirky bank heist film, both featuring his favourite Hollywood star, Denzel Washington.

Outside the world of movies, Lee remains active in causes that feature a strong message against racism.

Still bursting with creative energy, the determined filmmaker continues to surprise audiences as he tackles one unique subject after the other.

Watch part one:



Watch part two:

This episode of One on One airs from Friday, October 17, 2008, at 02:30GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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