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Riz Khan
Arabs in Hollywood
A look at why stereotypical portrayals of Arabs continue.
Last Modified: 14 Aug 2008 12:53 GMT

Ahmed Ahmed discusses his struggles as an Arab-American in Hollywood [GALLO/GETTY]
They are the terrorist, the villain or perhaps you see them in the briefest cameo appearance, rarely are Arabs seen in any other way by Hollywood.

According to our guests some of the biggest blockbusters continue to reinforce some of the most damaging stereotypes.

Is it a question of art imitating life, or have Arabs been the movie terrorists long before 9/11?

On Monday's Riz Khan we take a look at stereotypical portrayals of Arabs in Hollywood and why they continue.

We talk to Jack Shaheen, author of the new book Guilty, Hollywood's Verdict on Arabs After 9/11 on why he thinks certain images continue to prevail.

We also speak to actor Ahmed Ahmed and producer Abdullah Omeish, on their struggles as Arab-Americans in the entertainment world.

Watch part one of this episode of Riz Khan.

watch part two of this episode of Riz Khan.


You can join the conversation by clicking on the button above and sending your feedback or emailing riz@aljazeera.net.

Watch Riz live at 2030GMT, with repeats at 0030GMT and 0530GMT

Source:
Al Jazeera
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