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Riz Khan
Michael Sohlman
Riz speaks with the executive-director of the Nobel Foundation.
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2007 12:41 GMT

Michael Sohlman, the executive director of the Nobel Foundation, talks to Riz Khan
On Tuesday Riz speaks with Michael Sohlman, the executive director of the Nobel Foundation. Since 1901 Nobel prizes have been awarded for human achievement in physics, chemistry, medicine, peace and literature. In 1968 a sixth prize was inaugurated for economics.

The prizes are coveted for more than the diploma, medal and cash award (currently estimated at close to $1.5m). They seem to represent a large 'thank you' from humankind for trailblazing scientists, writers and politicians.

But the history of the Nobel Prize has not always been a smooth one.

Watch the interview to find out more.

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You can watch Riz Khan at 1900gmt, with repeats at 0000GMT, 0500GMT, and 0930GMT.

This episode of Riz Khan aired on Tuesday November 06, 2007


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