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Riz Khan
Paulo Coelho
We speak with the author of 'The Alchemist' who considers writing a path to self-knowledge.
Last Modified: 07 Sep 2007 08:02 GMT

Paulo Coelho is one of the world's best-selling authors [AP]
Paulo Coelho is one of the world's best-selling authors but he considers writing not just a business but as a path to self-knowledge'.

Born and raised in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, Coelho has walked a turbulent path in life.

After a youth filled with rebelliousness, drug use and jail time, he found himself on a spiritual search during which he pursued Eastern religion, mysticism and black magic. 

These experiences led to the creation of most of his works for which he is most famous. In May 2007 his latest work, 'The Witch of Portobello' was published.

On Thursday’s 'Riz Khan' we speak to Brazilian author, lyricist and novelist Paulo Coelho.

Best known for his novel 'The Alchemist', Coelho's has sold over 92 million books and his works have been translated into 66 languages in more than 150 countries around the world.

Watch the episode here:

 

Watch Street Talk here:


 

This episode of Riz Khan aired on Thursday 6th September 2007.


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