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Revolution Through Arab Eyes
Tahrir Diaries
The events that transpired in Tahrir transformed not only Egypt but the Egyptians who found their voice in the square.
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2012 12:20

Filmmaker: Mohammed Mamdouh

"The spirit of revolution has always existed in our hearts. They didn't know it could flare up at any time. It has arisen after 60 years. But it's real."
Ahmed Khaled, an Egyptian protester 

On January 25, 2011, the Egyptian people took to the streets in protests that would become a revolution and eventually topple the regime of President Hosni Mubarak. The events that unfolded in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the physical and symbolic heart of the uprising, would change not only Egypt but all those who were there, participating in the demonstrations.

Airing times
An excerpt of this film will be available to watch online. It can be seen in full on Al Jazeera English from Tuesday, January 24, at the following times.

Tuesday: 2000 GMT; Wednesday: 1200 GMT; Thursday: 0100 GMT; Friday: 0600 GMT; Saturday: 2000 GMT; Sunday: 1200 GMT; Monday: 0100 GMT; Tuesday: 0600 GMT

"I was born on January 19, 1987," says engineer Ahmed Khaled. "[But] I've changed that to January 25, 2011. Those previous 24 years of my life were nothing. My life started ... on January 25, 2011."

"I now have a voice through which I can express my opinion, without insulting anyone else. I can express my opinion and listen to others. I now know how to express myself after 24 years."

This film follows three Egyptian protesters during those crucial days in January 2011, as uncertainty turned to rage, rage to determination and, eventually, determination to joy. Marketing manager Abdel Rahman Haredy, journalist Mohamed Farag and engineer Ahmed Khaled each reflect upon how, as they "left behind their lives and families to build the new Egypt", they also found something new in themselves.

"The revolution has taught me how to experience joy each day," explains Haredy. "It has taught me about cherishing friendships with my fellow protesters. I don't know them but we miss each other. Our blood and sweat have united us. Despite our suffering, the first thing we say when we wake up is: 'Good morning Egypt'."

 
About the series:

A year on from the wave of protests that sparked the 'Arab Spring', this series of documentaries by Arab filmmakers offers a fresh insight into the uprisings that shook their countries.
Source:
Al Jazeera
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