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Artscape: Poets of Protest

Manal Al Sheikh: Fire Won't Eat Me Up

It is lethal for the poet to write in Iraq, so she struggles to inspire from snowy Norway.

Last updated: 06 Apr 2014 12:44
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"I really hate to say this but this is the truth, there is no Iraq now."

Poet, editor and activist Manal Al Sheikh says it is now lethal for her to be a writer in her home town of Nineveh, Iraq.

But thanks to Facebook and Twitter she can practice her unique blend of poetry and activism from her Scandinavian exile and continue to inspire her large following.

We follow her as she prepares a new poem for a public reading, in Norwegian.

Filmmaker's view: Keeping the protest alive

By Roxana Vilk

I was really keen that we have an Iraqi poet in the Poets of Protest series. When I read Manal Al Sheikh's fiery work I was immediately captivated, as she seemed to truly encapsulate the essence of a poet and activist combined.

As Manal says: "When you are a person from a country like Iraq you automatically have some anger inside you and this anger, if you are a poet or a writer, you can transfer it as an explosion in your text."

Manal is originally from Nineveh in northern Iraq, one of the oldest and greatest cities in antiquity and a place renowned for its multi-cultural society. Since the 2003 invasion, Nineveh has been the scene of some of the bloodiest and most violent fighting.

"I witnessed everything, the bombing, the struggle between the parties, all these make you angry, so I protest with my text," the poet explains.

However, Manal's work as an outspoken poet and journalist in Iraq was fraught with danger and her life was constantly under threat. She had to make the heart-breaking decision to leave her country and her family and seek refuge with her two young children in Norway.

"For me as a female writer in Iraq, just being female it was of course a challenge; just to live there in a normal way with my thoughts and my ambitions for a future. But really I can say the main change in my life was becoming a single mother in that society. Suddenly I found myself a widow, a very young widow," Manal reflects.

I travelled with Ian Dodds, the director of photography, to Stavanger in Norway in January 2012, during the depths of the Norwegian winter, as temperatures were plummeting to an unforgiving -20 degrees Celsius. Filming the stark contrast of the snowy cold white landscapes against Manal's stories of Iraq made her struggle to have her voice heard all the more poignant.

At a time when it is dangerous to speak out in Iraq, especially as a woman, Manal had to travel half way around the world to keep her protest alive.

Our film follows Manal closely as she works through crafting a new poem, before presenting it to a public audience. Manal is a truly extraordinary poet, brave and defiant, at a time when Iraqi female voices are increasingly being silenced.

About the series

Poets of Protest reflects the poet's view of the change sweeping the Middle East and North Africa through its intimate profiles of six contemporary writers as they struggle to lead, to interpret and to inspire.

Poetry lives and breathes in the Middle East as in few other places.

In a region long dominated by authoritarian regimes, poetry is the medium for expressing people's hopes, dreams and frustrations. Poets became historians, journalists, entertainers - and even revolutionaries.

    Poets of Protest was first broadcast in 2012

 

This episode of Artscape: Poets of Protest can be seen from Saturday, April 5 , at the following times GMT: Saturday: 2230; Sunday: 0930; Monday: 0330; Tuesday 1630.

Click here for more Artscape: Poets of Protest.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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