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The Tripoli documents

The papers that give an insight into communications between Gaddafi's intelligence apparatus and the UK and US agencies.

Last updated: 18 Dec 2013 01:56
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Peter Bouckaert, HRW emergencies director, discovered the documents while examining the Libyan government's external security building in Tripoli, which had been abandoned by Gaddafi forces [GALLO/GETTY]
The 'war on terror' and extraordinary renditions

Following the fall of the Gaddafi regime many of his opponents are now residing freely in Libya.

Human Rights Watch conducted interviews with 14 former detainees to document the degree of involvement of the US government, under the Bush administration, in the arrest of these men, the subsequent torture and other ill treatment in US custody, and their forced transfer back to Libya.

Many of the men were members of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG) and now play prominent roles in the post-Gaddafi political landscape.

View the full report below

 

The Tripoli documents

On September 3, 2011, Peter Bouckaert, HRW emergencies director, discovered the so-called 'Tripoli Documents' while examining the Libyan government's external security building in Tripoli, which had been abandoned by Gaddafi forces.

The papers give a unique insight into communications between Moussa Koussa, the former Libyan intelligence chief, the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the UK's secret intelligence service MI6, as well as the intelligence agencies of Germany and other countries.

These documents now form the basis of a lawsuit against the British government.

Al Jazeera has seen the originals - view a redacted version below

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Source:
Human Rights Watch
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