[QODLink]
People & Power
Peace in the favelas
We investigate the dramatic pacification of Rio's favelas in anticipation of the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.
Last Modified: 13 Nov 2011 14:30

Dilma Rousseff, Brazil's president and the first woman to hold the post, has vowed to continue with the poverty reducing programme of her predecessor, President Lula.    

One of his administration's most high profile policies was aimed at sorting out the problems of the shantytowns  - or favelas - in and around Rio de Janeiro. 

For decades the favelas have been a deadly battleground, where thousands died in the turf wars of rival gangsters and drug lords.

But in anticipation of the football World Cup in 2014 and the 2016 Summer Olympics, the government launched a new initiative.

Since then the Police Pacifying Units (UPP), have moved into 12 favelas, freeing 150,000 people from the control of the gangs and bringing a new calm to embattled neighbourhoods.

But as filmmakers Dom Rotheroe and Alfonso Daniels found out - while most residents in the UPP-controlled favelas welcome the fragile peace others fear it may not last.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.