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PEOPLE & POWER
Revolution gone wrong
After the uprising in Kyrgyzstan, we take a look at the country's new de-facto leader.
Last Modified: 14 Apr 2010 13:14 GMT

The recent uprising in Kyrgyzstan is the second in five years.
 
In 2005, after years of corruption and violence under the rule of President Askar Akayev, the people of Kyrgyzstan overthrew the government in a bloodless revolt known as the Tulip Revolution.
 
However, Kurmanbek Bakiyev, the country's new president, was soon accused of following the shady and repressive practices of his predecessor, appointing close family members to key positions in government and paying scarce regard to human rights. 
 
One of the people behind the Tulip Revolution - and this month's dramatic uprising too - was Roza Otunbayeva, Kyrgyzstan's former foreign minister.

In 2005 she wanted more freedom and economic development for her country but she quickly became disillusioned with Bakiyev's regime. 

Otunbayeva has now emerged at the head of the interim government that has just deposed him. She has promised a new constitution, elections within six months time and to bring the overturned president to justice.
 
So what is Otunbayeva like and will she be able to deliver?

Back in 2008 filmmaker Michael Andersen met her for this People & Power report, when the strength of her opposition to Bakiyev's rule was already evident.

This episode of People & Power can be seen from Wednesday, April 14, 2010 at the following times GMT: Wednesday: 0600, 1230; Thursday: 0130, 1400, 1930; Friday: 0630, 1630; Saturday: 0330, 2030; Sunday: 0030, 0530; Monday: 0830.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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