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People & Power
Never forget Srebrenica
One man's fight to bring Radovan Karadzic and Radko Mladic to justice.
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2010 14:05 GMT

 

 The murder of nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims was carried out by Bosnian Serb forces [EPA]

In March 2010, Serbia's parliament adopted a resolution apologising for the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, the worst atrocity in Europe since the second world war.

The resolution, approved by a slim majority, and seen by some observers as an attempt to clear a path to membership of the European Union, admits that Serbia should have done more to prevent the killings.
 
It stops short of describing the atrocity as genocide even though it has been recognised as such by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague.

Several Bosnian Serbs have been convicted by the tribunal and their former leader Radovan Karadzic is currently on trial.
 
The truth about the massacres, and their horrific scale and intent was uncovered by a dedicated French policeman named Jean Rene Ruez, who was working for the tribunal.

In July 1995, at the height of the Bosnian war, Jean-René Ruez arrived in Sarajevo tasked with hunting down snipers.

After hearing rumours that thousands of Muslim men were being tortured and executed, he quickly abandoned his original mission.

Appointed chief investigator by The Hague, Ruez has spent the past 13 years working tirelessly to prove the massacres were planned in advance.

Haunted by all he has learnt and worn down by the weight of his responsibility, Ruez has sacrificed everything to try and hold the guilty to account.

Through his eyes, we gain a moving perspective into what happened at Srebrenica.

Everywhere Jean-René goes, his computer goes with him never leaving his hand.

The computer contains hundreds of documents and photos. But its most valuable contents are a few minutes of blurry footage, a film Ruez spent years trying to hunt down.

The images speak for themselves. One by one, hands tied behind their back, the prisoners step forward. Slowly, methodically, soldiers open fire.

The awful truth is that no matter how shocking these scenes are, they do not reflect how bad other executions were.

Ruez's work has proved that the Balkans worst atrocities were masterminded and ordered by Radovan Karadzic and Radko Mladic.

With the handover of Karadzic to the United Nations War Crimes Tribunal, finally the families may begin their mourning.

This episode of People & Power airs from Wednesday, April 7, 2010 at the following times GMT: Wednesday: 0600, 1230; Thursday: 0130, 1400, 1930; Friday: 0630, 1630; Saturday: 0330, 2030; Sunday: 0030, 0530; Monday: 0830.

The programme originally aired on Friday, August 2, 2008.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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