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One on One
Karen Armstrong
The religious scholar and former nun has called upon faith leaders to collaborate to promote peaceful coexistence.
Last Modified: 05 Aug 2011 09:25


Religious scholar Karen Armstrong has written more than 20 books on faith in the modern world and the history of religion. A former nun, Armstrong's personal journey through Christianity inspired her curiosity in all three of the major monotheistic religions - Islam, Judaism and Christianity.

Her provocative views often challenge the perspectives of faith-based communities, although her teachings encourage an understanding of the commonalities between religions and their origins.

Upon receiving the TED prize in 2008, she called upon faith leaders around the world to collaborate on a Charter of Compassion to promote the Golden Rule and peaceful coexistence between religions.

She says: "Religion isn't about believing in things. It's ethical alchemy. It's about behaving in a way that changes you, that gives you intimations of holiness and sacredness."

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, August 6, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0430; Sunday: 0830, 1930; Monday: 1430.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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