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One on One
Toumani Diabate
The award-winning Malian musician is a master of the traditional kora and collaborates across cultural genres.
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2011 13:10


Malian musician Toumani Diabate's family history includes 71 generations of kora players preceding him.  

His father, Sidiki Diabate, recorded the first kora album in the 1970s, which became a platform for Toumani's growing success at a young age.

His own recording career began in England in the 1980s with his solo album Kaira. In addition to performing traditional Malian music, he collaborates across cultures to introduce a wide range of global blends, including flamenco, American jazz, blues and classical instrumentation. 

His collaborative album In the Heart of the Moon (2005) with the late Ali Farka Toure won the Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album. Toumani Diabate continues to work with aspiring musicians and youth in Mali to help preserve the art of kora-playing and the long oral history that it carries.

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, July 16, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0430; Sunday: 0830, 1930; Monday: 1430.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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