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One on One
Pervez Musharraf
The former president of Pakistan shares the early influences of public service on his extensive career.
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2011 11:25 GMT

President Musharraf of Pakistan (2001-2008) took power after an extensive and accomplished military career spanning over 35 years. Following a non-violent coup, Musharraf served as Pakistan's 10th president, leading efforts to reform the weakening economic and political structures of his country.

He introduced cultural ideas such as 'enlightened moderation' and promoted peace within Pakistan. He believes his greatest accomplishment as president was "giving confidence and trust - in the country, in the people of Pakistan."

His life story is one of public service that was cultivated in strong family values and discipline. Raised in a family of civil servants, he realised at a young age his natural instincts as a leader.

Although his popularity began to wain in the final year of his tenure due to anti-Musharraf media activism, new respect and admiration grew to him after his resignation from office.

Yet his ability to remain grounded allows him to relate to all walks of life: "I don't believe in people coming and saluting me or holding me on a pedestal. I have my feet on the ground always."

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, January 8, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0730, 2330; Sunday: 0300; Monday: 1430.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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