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One on One
Rebiya Kadeer
The leading Uighur activist and philanthropist shares her stories of yielding persistence and strength.
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2010 09:28 GMT

Rebiya Kadeer is recognised as the most prominent human rights advocate and leader of the Uighur people.

Her remarkable life story of persistence and compassion continues to inspire others in the face of adversity around the world.

Born into poverty in the Xinjiang province of China, Kadeer identified with her Uighur and Muslim roots from an early age despite the growing suppression of the Uighur people by the Chinese government. 

She first gained fame as an astute businesswoman and in the 1990s she was the seventh-richest person in China. 

Always committed to empowering her community, she became an active philanthropist and established the "Thousand Mothers Movement" in 1997 to promote job training and education for Uighur women. 

However, her outspoken criticisms of the Chinese policies towards Uighur people led to a series of detentions, imprisonments, and eventually exile from her homeland. 

Rebiya Kadeer discusses with Riz Khan the trials and tribulations she has faced in fighting for human rights.

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, October 9, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0030, 0730, 2330; Sunday: 0030; Monday: 0630; Tuesday: 1230; Wednesday: 1430; Friday: 0030.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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