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ONE ON ONE
Ronnie Screwvala
The entrepreneur talks about launching India's first cable TV network.
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2010 13:46 GMT



In 2008, Esquire magazine called him one of the 75 most influential people of the 21st century. In 2009, Time magazine listed him as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

As the CEO and founder of UTV Group, Ronnie Screwvala has been at the forefront of an emerging media revolution in India for nearly three decades.

What started as an idea to launch cable TV in Mumbai is now one of the world's most influential media empires.

His own attitude towards life reflects the risk-taking and balance that has allowed most of his ventures to thrive in a very unpredictable industry.

Today, with the popularity of reality TV and interactive media on the rise, he is confident that India is best positioned to cultivate the creative talent and entrepreneurial spirit that is needed in a competitive global market.

UTV's success has not been limited to India alone. As an international entrepreneur, Ronnie has launched partnerships with global giants, including Disney, Time Warner, Fox Searchlight, and Sony.

In this week's One on One, Ronnie Screwvala tells Riz Khan how he built a dynamic, adaptable company and his vision for the future of media. 

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, April 17, 2010 at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0030, 1630; Sunday: 0430, 2330; Monday: 0300, 1230.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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