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ONE ON ONE
Annie Lennox
Meet the musician, activist and global icon.
Last Modified: 01 May 2010 12:19 GMT



She has been called one of the 100 greatest singers of all time. Annie Lennox discusses life as a musician, activist and global icon.

Born in Scotland and trained in music from an early age, pop culture icon Annie Lennox has always pushed the limits of music with great success.

After recording with bands The Tourists and Eurythmics in the 1980s, she launched a solo career that has won her a Golden Globe and an Academy Award. 

"I had to kind of rebel from something quite conventional in order to go as far as I had to go to find out who I was as a musician," she says.

But her work does not stop there. Annie Lennox has always experimented with her image as an artist, a gay icon and a woman. 

As an activist and humanitarian, she has used her music and fame to spread messages about Aids awareness, democracy, and human rights around the world. 

Annie Lennox talks to Riz Khan about what influences her to speak out on these issues and how she combines activism with art.

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, May 01, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0030, 1630; Sunday: 0430, 2330; Monday: 0300, 1230.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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