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One on One
Amitabh Bachchan
One of Bollywood's most successful actors talks about his career.
Last Modified: 22 Mar 2010 14:26 GMT



He started out going door to door trying to get the attention of producers and looking for any role. 

Amitabh Bachchan had no acting experience but gave up a job working for a shipping company and moved to Mumbai in the hope of making it onto the big screen.

He says his timing was lucky, playing the role of the "angry young man" in the  early 1970s at a time when India was going through a difficult period, attracting audiences to the characters he played standing up against the system.

It was the start to a hugely successful career that has spanned more than four decades and has seen him move into television production and for a short while being involved in politics.

Amitabh Bachchan has lived through many changes in the Indian film industry, has won numerous major awards in his career, but despite having achieved so much he is still looking forward to his next role.

Amitabh Bachchan joins Riz to discuss his career as one of the most successful actors in the history of Indian cinema.

This episode of One on One aired from Saturday, March 20, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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