[QODLink]
ONE ON ONE
MF Husain
The Pablo Picaso of India discusses his controversial art and international success.
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2010 13:27



He has been called the Pablo Picasso of India, MF Husain discusses his sometimes controversial art and his journey to international success.

His mother died when he was just one-and-a-half years old and this became the inspiration for some of his most famous and controversial paintings.

Maqbool Fida Husain, popularly know as MF Husain, says that he has been searching for the image of Indian womanhood throughout his career.

It is a journey that led to controversy when his paintings of naked Hindu goddesses resulted in obscenity charges being filed against him and attacks on his home. As a result he went into a self-imposed exile.

MF Husain knew that he wanted to be a painter from an early age and slept on pavements and worked in hotels while pursuing this passion. 

His dedication paid off and his paintings are exhibited around the world fetching up to $2mn, the highest of any Indian painter. He has never had a studio and works out of hotel rooms and friend's houses, he describes painting not as a profession but as lifetime of education.

This episode of One on One aired on February 13, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.