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One on One
General Anthony Zinni
Meet the former commander-in-chief of US Central Command.
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2009 01:11 GMT



Watch part two

This week on One on One, Riz Khan talks with General Anthony Zinni, the former commander-in-chief of US Central Command.

He served his country as one of its most distinguished military men – but was never afraid to speak out when he thought troops should stay out.

As a four-star general, he saw service in most of the major international conflicts since and including the Vietnam war.

The son of Italian immigrants, he was born just outside Philadelphia just before the end of World War II.

Young Tony Zinni enjoyed being part of a very close extended family, and went through a strict Catholic education.

Eventually graduating from Villanova University with a degree in economics before being commissioned second lieutenant in the US Marine Corps.

It was not long before he was sent off to Vietnam on active duty in 1967 – returning again in 1970.

Zinni climbed through the ranks quickly as a competent and respected officer, serving on major fronts across the world, before becoming the commander-in-chief of the US Central Command (Centcom). A level of achievement that keeps him very much in demand even in his post-military life.

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, November 7, 2009 at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0130, 1630; Sunday: 0430; Monday: 0300, 1230.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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