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One on One
Gil Scott-Heron
Meet the American poet, musician and writer often referred to as 'the godfather of rap'.
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2009 13:32 GMT

Gil Scott-Heron was a fixture of the US black music scene in the 1960s and 1970s

This week on One on One Riz Khan talks with American poet, musician and writer, Gil Scott-Heron.

Often called the godfather of rap, he was a fixture of the American black music scene in the later 1960s and early 1970s, with his unique "spoken-word soul".

He often commented on the leading issues facing large parts of urban society, such as poverty and racism.

He was born in Chicago, but grew up in Jackson, Tennessee, with his maternal grandmother.

Gil Scott-Heron's father, Giles - also called Gil - was nicknamed "The Black Arrow" as the first black athlete to play soccer with Glasgow's Celtic football club.

Scott-Heron's own career as a musician took off once he moved to New York - although his friendship with fellow musician and collaborator, Brian Jackson, began in  college.

Scott-Heron is known for his fusions and spoken word style, made famous with his  critically-acclaimed, "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised".

He calls himself a "Bluesologist" although his work with many top musicians has given him a style that is hard to pigeon-hole.

Ultimately, Gil Scott-Heron continues to look for new ways to express his views through his voice and the sound of his instruments.

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, October 31, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0130, 1630; Sunday: 0430; Monday: 0300, 1230.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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