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One on One
Sami Yusuf
We meet the singer and composer.
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2009 10:36 GMT

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This week on One on One, Riz Khan talks to the internationally renowned singer and composer, Sami Yusuf.

Raised in London by his Azeri parents, he learnt a number of instruments and musical styles from a young age.

As he started to compose and write lyrics, Sami found himself focusing a lot on values drawn from his faith as a Muslim.

Although he insists he is not a "Muslim singer", his first two albums, Al-Mu'allim and My Ummah reflect his beliefs in modern Islamic philosophy.

It brought him a fan base of millions across the world - largely from people empathising with his message of unity and peace through faith.

In spite of a bitter separation from his first management company, Sami has gone on to create new music that continues to draw on positive values and brings more people into his large international following.

This episode of One on One aired from Saturday, June 20, 2009.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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