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One on One
Muna AbuSulayman
The versatile media celebrity from Saudi Arabia.
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2009 12:57 GMT



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This week on One on One, meet television host and activist, Muna AbuSulayman.

Her perspective as a modern young Saudi with global presence has made Muna AbuSulayman the ideal candidate for many of the tasks she has undertaken.

Becoming one of the leading media celebrities in the Middle East was not enough for this young Saudi woman.

As the executive director of the Kingdom Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Kingdom Holding Company run by Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, a Saudi billionaire businessman, she has the responsibility of bridging cultures and religions through strategic projects and humanitarian assistance.

This ties into the work Muna AbuSulayman does as the first Saudi woman to be appointed as a Goodwill Ambassador by the United Nations Development programme (UNDP) and as a Global Young Leader of the World Economic Forum.

On top of that, she co-hosts one of the Middle East's most popular programmes focused on social issues, Kalam Nawaem, making her not only visible but active as a prominent young Arab woman.

This episode of One on One aired from Friday, August 01, 2008

Source:
Al Jazeera
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