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One on One
Russell Simmons
The multi-millionaire media mogul talks to Riz Khan.
Last Modified: 16 Jul 2008 12:43 GMT

Russell Simmons continues to shape the
hip-hop music scene
This week on One on One, meet the founder of Def Jam records, Russell Simmons.

Creating a world of hip-hop took him from being a street hustler to a multi-millionaire media mogul by the time he was in his thirties and he quickly became one of the most influential figures in the US music industry.

Known as "Rush", the entrepreneurial native of Queens, New York, spent his early years connected to the street scene that would eventually make him one of hip-hops wealthiest names.

Before long he was managing his younger brother Joseph's group, Run DMC, and busy setting up the iconic Def Jam records with punk rock fan, Rick Rubin.

Def Jam built up stars such as LL Cool J, Public Enemy and the Beastie Boys.

Proving he had shrewd business skills, Simmons soon branched out to launch the successful clothing line, Phat Farm - and later, Baby Phat, managed by his now ex-wife, former supermodel, Kimora Lee.

Even though he sold his shares in Def Jam in 1999, Simmons continues to shape the hip-hop music scene and influences some of its top stars.

This episode of One on One airs from Saturday, July 19, 2008.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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