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One on One
Eduardo Kac
Riz Khan meets a man who built a 'time capsule' and calls himself a 'bio' artist.
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2008 07:32 GMT

Eduardo Kac describes himself as
a 'transgenic' artist
This week on One on One Riz Khan meets the pioneering artist, Eduardo Kac.

His unique "Time Capsule" project involved him injecting technology into his body - a microchip in his ankle to be more precise - where it remains discreetly tucked away.

He has created a number of highly-publicised works which are often radically different and usually interactive.

The scientific approach to the artwork exhibited by Eduardo Kac is generally evident to those drawn to it.

Less discreet are his artistic pieces involving glowing animals or the one entitled Genesis which featured large-scale projections of bacteria growing with a gene implanted into it by Kac.

This project could be viewed closely over the internet - a medium favoured by Kac as a way to make his work globally interactive.

As science evolves, so too does the work of a man who describes himself as a 'transgenic' or 'bio' artist.

Watch part one of this episode of One on One on YouTube

Watch part two of this episode of One on One on YouTube

This episode of One on One aired on Saturday, February 23, 2008


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