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One on One
Buzz Aldrin
Riz Khan meets the veteran astronaut.
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2008 10:19 GMT

Buzz Aldrin on the
way to the moon

Only a dozen people can boast having walked on the moon, but the talents of this veteran astronaut go further, as he helped to shape the way space travel was developed in the early years.

Born Edwin Eugene Aldrin, he got the name Buzz as a toddler, when his sister mispronounced "brother" as "buzzer."

Aldrin honed his skills as a fighter pilot, but became a household name when the Apollo 11 mission made history with the first landing on the moon in 1969. And he even gave his name to a space commander in the popular animated film Toy Story.

This week on One on One, Riz Khan meets Buzz Aldrin.

Watch part one of this episode of One on One on Youtube

Watch part two of this episode of One on One on Youtube

This episode of One on One aired from Saturday, January 26, 2008


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