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Naif Awadh Ali
'Everybody starts by singing at weddings in Aden of course.'
Last Modified: 11 May 2011 13:06

"I am Naif Awadh Ali Salem. I was born in Bureiqa district in Aden governorate, in Yemen. I started singing 25-years ago. I am married with six children; four boys and two girls.  

My history as a singer, I started just like any other one. Yemen is rich with many styles of music and arts. I also come from a family of artists. I have managed to become a famous singer through my personal effort along with the support of several professionals. 

How to become a known singer? Everybody starts by singing at weddings in Aden of course. In Aden, there are reception parties, weddings, Qat sessions and other occasions. That is how the fame of a singer starts.

Some may think this is not a good way to appear as a singer, but let us be honest. Meetings happen at wedding parties. If a singer presents good performance in a wedding party by singing various styles of music, he attracts admiration of people.

Those planning to get married will also ask him to sing at their parties, and so ... this plays a big role in building a singer's fame in Aden governorate.  

I wish for my country, our people to like each other. I ask Allah for each decision-making person in this country to welcome others' opinions. We have had enough suffering in this country. I wish Yemen to always be the best, God willing." 

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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