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Next Music Station
Shouruq
'Our ancestor's heritage is dying out.'
Last Modified: 11 May 2011 13:18

"I am Shurouq. I was born in Aden. I graduated from Aden Fine Arts Institute. I have been singing since 1990. I have worked inside and outside Yemen. Besides being a singer, I am also an actress.  

Yemen has several kinds of music as it has various climate conditions. As you see, we witness the four seasons on one day as we move from one Yemeni city to another. And that is why the country is rich with various singing styles. You can even find different music styles as you move from one village to another.

Our country's beauty comes from the variety of its colours. Each colour has a special, beautiful spirit. All these music styles share a common problem: no archiving. Unfortunately, our ancestor's heritage is dying out. The problem is when old singers pass away, no one re-sings their songs. No one cares enough to archive their music, except for the Yemen Music House which is currently trying to search and document our music heritage. It is, gratefully, doing a great, rewarding job.

We have another problem: all of our music heritage is being taken abroad, to the Arabian Gulf, to the entire Arab world, and it is being credited to non-Yemenis and to another legacy. Unfortunately ... 

A long time ago, before unity was reached, music was an obligatory school subject, even in Taaz, it was taught in schools. In Aden too, it was taught in schools. Then came the Aden Fine Arts Institute, from where many groups graduated. Most of the current musicians in Yemen graduated from this institute.

I don't know what happened then. Unfortunately, the music subject stopped to be taught in schools, the Fine Arts Institute did not work anymore. What happened? Nobody knows. The ministry of culture is supposed to give more attention to these matters. It should care about music. The ministry of education should re-insert music as a subject in schools so all people have enough awareness about music.

Music is very important for people. The culture of a nation is linked to its music. If Allah grants an artist a special talent, that talent can never be forbidden or incomplete. People should realise that God has made this artist a special person. 

What happens in this concert is that we present Yemeni music; traditional Yemeni songs and modern songs and we mix them with French songs, French music, and hip hop music. It will be a nice concert, and people will hopefully like it.

We try to create a common language between our music and other people's music." 

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