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Next Music Station
Soumaya Baalbaki
'Tango can't be shallow. It's all about love. Arab music is all about love.'
Last Modified: 25 May 2011 11:45

"I started singing when I was 16 years old. I was born and raised in a time of war. So it was difficult for me to start singing when I was a child.

I started late but I managed to join the conservatoire and obtained my music degree. 

I studied oriental singing and playing the oud. I first worked with an orchestra. We sang Andalusian Muwashah, classical Arabic music. I then started singing my own style.  

Tango music is full of emotion. You can't sing tango if you don't feel these emotions deep inside.

There's a lot of passion in tango dancing. Tango can't be shallow. It's all about love. Arab music is all about love. Most of our music glorifies love.  

Unlike other Arabs, the Lebanese people speak more than one language. People from all over the world pass through Lebanon and interact with its people and history.

There's a mixture of cultures in Lebanon. This has made us use many French, English and even Spanish words as we speak Arabic.

The same applies to the various styles of art in Lebanon, especially that we're a Mediterranean country linked to our neighbouring countries." 

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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