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Listening Post
Listening in at the Leveson Inquiry
The media scandal started with a single rogue reporter but is now tainting British governments, both past and present.
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2012 07:56

On Listening Post this week: Listening in at the Leveson Inquiry: Former British prime minister Tony Blair and cabinet minister Jeremy Hunt take the stand. And, the Washington Post 40 years after Watergate.

It has been one of the biggest, most protracted media scandals the world has ever seen. It started with a single rogue reporter but is now tainting British governments, both past and present, and could very lead to new set of rules and regulations for the UK media. This week, the drama intensifies at the Leveson Inquiry as former prime minister Tony Blair and current cabinet minister Jeremy Hunt take to the stand. 

This week's News Bytes: Wikileaks founder Julian Assange is one step closer to being extradited to Sweden to face allegations of sexual assault; the BBC misuses a picture from Iraq to illustrate its report on an alleged massacre in Syria; a small legal victory for a magazine in Myanmar could prove significant in the country's battle for a free press; and a media blackout in Greece after journalists there go on a nationwide strike.

In 1972, a bungled burglary at the Democratic Party's office in Washington triggered one of the most famous political scandals in history. Watergate led to the resignation of Richard Nixon, the only US president ever to do so, and launched the Washington Post into the media hall of fame thanks to the work of two of its reporters on that story. Since then the names of Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward have been synonymous with quality investigative journalism. But 40 years later, times have changed - and the Post is a shadow of its former self. Listening Post's Marcela Pizarro takes a look at the legacy of the Washington Post and the challenges for investigative journalism in a digital age.

Our Internet Video of the Week: It is a story that has shaken up the political establishment, threatened to bring down a media empire and exposed ties between politicians, the police and the press. There is only one thing for it: Leveson, The Musical. People at The Poke website must have had to watch hours and hours of testimony to come up with this offering. Suffice to say we know exactly what they feel like. We hope you enjoy the show. 

 
Listening Post can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0830, 1930; Sunday: 1430; Monday: 0430.

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Al Jazeera
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