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Listening Post
Peru's 'pink tide'
Across Latin America, privately owned right-wing media groups are waging war against their new left-wing governments.
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2012 13:38

It has been dubbed the 'Pink Tide'. It is the social revolution that has not made global media headlines. Over the past decade, Latin America has been living out its own 'spring'.

Countries from Venezuela to Argentina have all elected left-leaning leaders - despite privately owned and highly influential right-wing media conglomerates launching offensives intended to stop them gaining power.

The newest chapter in this old antagonism took place in Peru, where former army-chief-turned-politician Ollanta Humala was recently elected despite the country's most powerful media group, El Comercio, backing his rival, Keiko Fujimori. Fujimori is the daughter of the former president, Alberto Fujimori, who is currently serving life for human rights violations.

Listening Post's Marcela Pizarro maps the tension between the right-wing media establishment and the new left-wing government and asks how the president will navigate this hostile terrain.

"One of the things media owners and journalists like the most is to cry wolf all the time. The media don't quite know how to handle the government and the same goes for the government. It's definitely not a match made in heaven."

Mirko Lauer, La Republica

Source:
Al Jazeera
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