[QODLink]
Listening Post
Tightening the grip: China's media campaign
As Beijing announces 'Cultural Development Guidelines', can the state control what society wants to see?
Last Modified: 12 Mar 2012 11:39

Should the state control what society wants to see? The Chinese government seems to think so, with a flurry of media rules dubbed 'Cultural Development Guidelines'.

Most recently, advertising has been banned during TV dramas in an attempt to keep viewers' eyes from wandering elsewhere. Before that, the government announced the end of a crowd pleaser of a talent show.

And on the internet, journalists have been told they cannot report news stories found online or via phone networks without first getting official verification.

Listening Post's Meenakshi Ravi reports on the Chinese Communist Party's tightening grip on the media.

"The government is not able to full[y] control who has a voice to speak to the public and what kind of information the public can have access to. People being engaged in this discussion, they might just find different ways, or they discuss things in a different format, or maybe even using a different kind of language because on the Chinese internet, there are also all kinds of spoofs, parodies and euphemisms, all kinds of ways to circumvent the filtering and the censoring."

Bingchun Meng, a media lecturer at LSA

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.