[QODLink]
THE LISTENING POST
Maziar Bahari
An interview with the Iranian-Canadian journalist who was imprisoned in Iran.
Last Modified: 08 May 2010 12:57 GMT



This week's episode of The Listening Post is a special edition - we feature an extended cut of our interview with Iranian-Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari.

Iran has been a big media story ever since the disputed presidential elections last year.

Bahari was on assignment with Newsweek magazine covering the elections in June 2009 when he was arrested without charge and imprisoned in Iran's infamous Evin prison.

Richard Gizbert speaks to Bahari about the 118 days he spent in prison - what he went through, how he got through his time there and his insights about another well-known Iranian media figure currently behind bars in Evin, Hossein Derakhshan.

But 2009 was not the first time that Iran was at the centre of the international media's attention.

There were revolutions in 1953 and 1979 where the media played a big role. However, there was something unique about last year's story.

With the prevalence of the Internet and social media in Iran, the authorities could not control the flow of information as they had done in the past.

In the second half of the show, Maziar Bahari speaks about the impact the web is having on Iran, the skewed view of Iran's state-funded media and the TV satire show that was used as evidence to implicate him in court.

Sticking with the ethos of this week's show we selected an Iranian-Canadian music video as our web video of the week. The band, Blurred Vision, took a classic 1979 Pink Floyd track, Another Brick in the Wall, substituted a crucial word, and with it made a music video with a strong political message. Watch it here.

This episode of The Listening Post aired from Friday, May 7, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.