[QODLink]
Inside Story

Will Maliki's resignation save Iraq?

Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki has agreed to step down at a time of national crisis and deep division.

Last updated: 15 Aug 2014 20:28
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki agreed to step down on Thursday after eight years in office. In a sudden change of heart, Maliki caved in to domestic and international pressure.
 
He had been accused of misrule and monopolising power, divisive politics that have fractured Iraq and opened the door to fighters from the Islamic State, and a Sunni rebellion.
 
He is now backing a rival politician to take his place.
 
Speaking on national television, Maliki said: 'In order to enable the political process to go forward and to form the new government, I am withdrawing my nomination from the post of Prime Minister, in favour of the dear brother Haider al Abbadi, for the sake of the best interests of the country.'
 
Abbadi is from the same Shia political party as Maliki.
 
So, can he succeed where Maliki failed, reach out to Sunnis and Kurds, form a new, inclusive coalition - and stitch the country back together?
 
Presenter: Sohail Rahman
 
Guests:

Ghassan al Attiyah - Director of the Iraqi Foundation for Development and Democracy.
 
Mark Kimmitt -  Former US State Department official, retired Brigadier General - and former Deputy Director of Operations for Coalition Forces during the 2003 invasion of Iraq.
 
Nickolay Mladenov - UN Special Representative of the Secretary General for Iraq, and Head of the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq.

234

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
Muslim volunteers face questioning and threat of arrest, while aid has been disrupted or blocked, charities say.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
ISIL combatants seeking an 'exit strategy' from Mideast conflict need positive reinforcement back home, analysts say.
European nation hit by a wave of Islamophobia as many young fighters join ISIL in Syria and Iraq.
Featured
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Since she was 16-years-old, Scottish Nationalist Party's Sturgeon has strove for independence from the UK.
Armed group's ransom success with German hostages marks a re-emergence, as authorities investigate ISIL links.
Western nations are moving into the resource-rich country after decades of disinterest, challenging China's interests.
join our mailing list