[QODLink]
Inside Story

Thailand PM: Reform or repression?

The General who headed a military coup in May is appointed prime minister.  

Last updated: 21 Aug 2014 20:21
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Thailand's top general has been appointed prime minister, two months after overthrowing the elected government.
 
General Prayuth Chan-ocha was the only candidate. He was chosen by a legislature predominantly made up of military and police figures, in a vote lasting barely 15 minutes.
 
He said the May coup, and the imposition of martial law, were necessary to end years of political turbulance and violent protests.
 
Prayuth took over as head of the army in October 2010. He was seen then as a hardline royalist, and opposed to the Red Shirt movement that has largely backed the governments of Thaksin Shinawatra, and his sister Yingluck.
 
His first task now is to appoint a cabinet to oversee the establishment of a 250-member reform council. This council will be charged with writing a new constitution, to take effect in July next year. That's intended to pave the way for a general election in late 2015.
 
Critics though are concerned the military is seeking to strengthen its hold on the country.
 
So will the takeover signal an era or repression or new age of democratic reform?
 
Presenter: Laura Kyle
 
Guests :

Nattakorn Devakula - a political analyst for the Thai programme, The Daily Dose, and a former independent candidate for Bangkok governor.
 
Tim Forsyth - a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a South East Asia specialist.
 
Saksith Saiyasombut- a political blogger and founding member of Siam Voices.

250

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
Remnants of deadly demonstrations to be displayed in a new museum, a year after protests pushed president out of power.
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
join our mailing list