West African economies are feeling the impact of the world's worst outbreak of Ebola.
 
It's six months since the disease was diagnosed in Guinea. It has since spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.
 
The World Health Organization says more than half of identified cases have proved fatal, and it's warning that the death toll could eventually exceed 20,000.
 
But criticism is growing over the global response.
 
The medical charity Doctors Without Borders, says international efforts have been: "...chaotic and entirely inadequate to the scale of the crisis."
 
A statement said: "Self-protection is occupying the entire focus of states that have the expertise and resources to make a dramatic difference."
 
Travel and trade restrictions are now taking a toll on the econonies of the affected countries.
 
President of the African Development Bank, Donald Kaberuka, said: "Foreign exchange levels are down, markets are not functioning, airlines are not coming in, projects have been cancelled, business people have left. That is very, very damaging.
 
Add to that, the rainy season, people are not farming, the price of produce is going up, at a time when purchasing power is limited, so you're increasing poverty."
 
It is a huge problem for West Africa. But is it a global responsibility?
 
Presenter: Laura Kyle
 
Guests:

Aly-Khan Satchu - an independent trader and analyst, and African economy specialist.
 
Micaela Serafini - medical director for Doctors Without Borders.
 
Katie Mark - a filmmaker and journalist who has just returned from covering the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone.

Source: Al Jazeera