[QODLink]
Inside Story

Gaza ceasefire: Gone with the wind?

An Egyptian brokered truce for the Gaza Strip collapses as airstrikes resume.

Last updated: 16 Jul 2014 04:32
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

At first the Israeli government accepted the ceasefire proposed by Egypt. The Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, said it offered an opportunity to clear out rockets from the Gaza Strip.

The plan called for both sides to end all hostilities. That meant Israel would have to stop its air strikes and refrain from staging a ground invasion. In return, all Palestinian factions would have to stop firing rockets into Israel.

The proposed ceasefire also called for border crossings to open once the security situation stabilised, and for talks on a long-term truce to be held in Cairo within 48 hours.

But Hamas says it was not involved in any negotiations over any truce. 

So, is a ceasefire still possible? Or will there be a further escalation in the violence?

Presenter: Folly Bah Thibault

Guests:  

Joseph Kechichian, a political analyst

Gregg Roman, former adviser in the Israeli knesset, and a former official at the Israeli ministry of defence.

Azzam Tamimi, the director of the Institute of Islamic Political Thought. Azzam is also author of "Hamas: Unwritten Chapters". 

In Pictures

227

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.
join our mailing list