[QODLink]
Inside Story

Can politics tame Iraq's militias?

As Iraq is embroiled in turmoil, chances of a political settlement look increasingly slim.

Last updated: 03 Jul 2014 02:39
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Armed fighters in Iraq have made large territorial gains recently. The Iraqi army, though, says it is mounting a counteroffensive to regain those areas now controlled by the group Islamic State.

On Wednesday, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki offered an amnesty to tribesmen who have fought against the government, but excluded anyone who had "killed and shed blood."

Maliki says he hopes to overcome the challenges facing the formation of a new government. He made his statement a day after the new parliament's first session ended with no agreement on the appointment of top government posts. This, despite international calls for a united front.

And it is precisely this sort of political bickering that observers say has allowed the Sunni armed rebellion to gain traction.

Can those same politicians convince armed groups to take part in the political process? Are the men with the guns even interested? Or will the fighting in Iraq simply kill the political process?

Presenter: Mike Hanna

Guests: 

Christopher Hill, former US ambassador to Iraq.

Saad Al-Muttalibi, former political adviser to the Iraqi government.

Wadah Khanfar, president of the Al Sharq Forum.

206

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Despite 14-year struggle for a new mosque in the second-largest city, new roadblocks are erected at every turn.
Authorities and demonstrators have shown no inclination to yield despite growing economic damage and protest pressure.
Lebanese-born Rula Ghani may take cues from the modernising Queen Soraya, but she'll have to proceed with caution.
One of the world's last hunter-gatherer tribes has been forced from the forest it called home by a major dam project.
Chinese authorities scramble to cut off information on Hong Kong protests from reaching the mainland.
join our mailing list